Posted on 2 Comments

TI Statistics Programs Updated for Common Core Algebra II

O.k. So, I’ve updated the statistics programs for the TI-83/84 that are needed to do the simulations for Unit #13 (Statistics) in the new Common Core Algebra II.

Here are the programs and a description of what they do. Click on the link to download one and then use TI-Connect (and a cable) to get them onto your calculator. If you are unsure how to do this, click on the link below:

Instructions for TI-Connect (Don’t download statistics programs from this link).

Here are the programs:

NORMSAMP

NORMSAMP is a very simple program. The user specifies a mean and standard deviation for an infinite population that is normally distributed. The program will then simulate a sample from this population of any size and perform multiple simulations. This output is a list of sample means and a list of sample standard deviations.

 

PSIMUL

PSIMUL will pull a sample (of any size) from a population with a given proportion specified by the user. The population is assumed infinite (sampling with replacement essentially). The program will create as many samples as the user specifies and then exports a list of sample proportions.

 

MEANCOMP

This program allows the user to put in two lists with experimental results (Treatments 1 and 2). It then scrambles the data randomly and recalculates the differences in the treatment means. The user can do this as many times as they want in order to establish if the original difference was statistically significant.

 

 

Posted on

Statistical Simulation – The Effect of the Treatment on Sample Means

More than any other topic, I was most worried about writing lessons for the statistics standards in Common Core Algebra II. I’ve been a high school math teacher in New York now for 16 years. The extent I’ve taught stat has been the normal distribution in half-standard deviation increments (all you Integrated Course III teachers know what I’m saying). I taught college statistics over a decade ago at Syracuse University, but it’s been awhile.

So the prospect of somehow trying to tackle a standard like:

S-IC.5: Use data from a randomized experiment to compare two treatments; use simulations to decide if differences between parameters are significant.

Whew! Right?

Well, these have been some of my very favorite lessons to write. That’s mostly because I’ve gotten to do math and understand math better than before. And that’s been thrilling.

Here’s the lesson and homework set that I just created to address this standard. In order to run do the lesson, you MUST download and install the TI83/84 program MEANCOMP. Place data in L1 and L2 and the program will do amazing simulations!

Unit #13.Lesson #7.The Difference in Sample Means

MEANCOMP

DISTRIBUTION OF SAMPLE MEAN DIFFS

When the simulation is over it is good to SortA (sort ascending) your results that are in L3. In a newer version of the program I will be posting, this is done automatically.

Posted on

Statistical Simulation Programs for Download

O.k. So, after a bit of legwork, it turns out that it is not hard to post TI-83/84 programs to this site and its not even hard to have you download them.

A few days ago, I posted a document detailing three Statistics programs I wrote for the TI-83/84 to do the statistical simulations that are required in the new Common Core Algebra II. I created the simulation programs based on the simulations recommended in the G.A.I.S.E. Report (Guidelines for the Assessment and Instruction in Statistics Education). The New York State Department of Education has been referencing that report highly whenever they speak of the statistics in Common Core Algebra II. Here’s another posting of the article I wrote explaining the three programs:

Unit #13.Simulation Code for TI Programs

But, now, you don’t need to type them in. I want to sincerely thank Jenn Sauer, a great educator from my neck of the woods over in the beautiful town of Saugerties. Jenn was kind enough to brainstorm the statistics a bit with me and give me super helpful suggestions on the programs themselves. Here they are for download.

MEANCOMP

PSIMUL

RANDSAMP

Save them in a safe spot where you will know where they are.

O.k. Now, how do you get them onto your calculator especially if you are not used to doing this? First things first, you need to download TI Connect. It’s free and easy. Here’s the link:

TI Connect Link

Alright, once you have TI Connect you’ll see this main screen:

TI Connect Main Screen

You’ll need to connect your TI-84 or 83 to the computer using a USB chord. Hopefully you didn’t throw it away when you got your calculator.

TI Connect will automatically find your calculator. But, if you want to make sure, once you have the calculator plugged into the computer, turned on, and you have TI Connect open, click on the icon:

TI Device Explorer

This will allow you to find the calculator and browse its contents (programs, lists, apps). The first time it looks for your calculator, it may take a bit of time. Anyhow, go back to the home screen (the one up above). Now to get those programs onto your calculator. Click on the Send to Device icon:

Send to Device

You will then navigate to whatever folder you stored the programs in. Select them all at once and then send them to your calculator.

Selecting Files to Send

It will take a little bit (maybe a minute), but TI Connect will keep you up to date on the progress.

That’s it. I hope you can use these as you prepare for the coming of statistics in Common Core Algebra II. I will be putting out an entire statistics unit in late March, so wait until then to see the full power of these programs. Until then, play around with them.

But, be sure to print out the first document I posted in this entry. It serves as the defacto users guide to the programs. Please note that the code has been slightly changed from what is in the documents. Here it is again for your convenience:

Unit #13.Simulation Code for TI Programs

P.S. I just clicked on the links, downloaded the programs and sent them to my absolutely older TI-83+ without a hitch.